What To Do About Camping Slobs

litter at campsite
The spoor of jackass campers

Camping slobs–do NOT get me started. I hate it when I try my best to keep the camp organized and half the group drops crap everywhere. Or when I leave my camp kitchen immaculate, go on a hike and come back to food and dirty utensils on every surface. Or when the shovel, axe, chairs or jackets and towels are strewn around the site with no regard for possible rain or tripping accidents? It’s enough to make me double my beer intake.

It sure as heck bothers most people who like a modicum of order. So how do we avoid all that? Here are some ideas:

A place for everything.

One of the most effective preventative measures is literally having a place for everything.  Many times camping items get left in awkward areas because no one is sure where to leave it. If you have a stack of wood near the campfire, create a tool rack for the axe, shovel, hotdog forks and anything fire related. Just drive two sturdy sticks into the ground that are forked at the top end. Place another stick in the forks. Lean the tools up against it.  Rig a tarp so it protects the wood and tools from rain. You have a place for stuff.

If your covered camp kitchen is too small to put all the gear in, do what we do. Place the coolers in a tidy row along once side of the kitchen tent on the outside. That way it’s readily accessible for preparing food but keeps the kitchen area fairly clear of clutter.

Organize a wash station and keep soap, a wash basin, cloth and a towel there. Keep it near the camp stove so heating water is easier. Arrange drinkables on a table with glasses and utensils. Add condiments and sugar, salt and pepper. People can go there for drinks and flavoring throughout the day without getting underfoot. And everything has a specific place!

containers.

You can never have too many containers at a camp site.

Take along two pop-up laundry hampers, the ones you buy at the dollar store that fold down into a flat disc. Put a garbage bag in each of them. One is for garbage you can’t burn, the other is for recyclables. If you still have a slob that insists on leaving cans or bottles on the ground and walking away, direct their attention to the recycle bin.

Boxes that fold flat and open up for use can be great for small things. Fire starter, work gloves, extra tarps, kids toys, or anything else that has a tendency to spread out on a site can be placed in one.

Hang things up–cup hooks screwed into a tree works. So does a belt around a tree trunk with “S” hooks hanging from it. And good old fashioned clothes lines are great for getting things up and at eye level.

Small plastic bins for utensils and little items can be prepacked; just take off the lid, place it on the table, and put the plastic bin on top. At night you can replace the lid, and when you pack up to go home, just put the small bin in the larger kitchen bins you have. Small plastic containers like that keep the mess under control in the kitchen.

signage!

This is something I did a couple of years ago and I’m still wondering why I didn’t think of it sooner.

When you’re at home, invest in a laminator and laminating pouches. Then go sign crazy! Print out signs from your computer and laminate them. You can place them on trees using thumb tacks and tent poles using duct tape. It’s amazing what a sign will do to remind people to keep the area tidy. Some suggestions:

  1. Washing Station (Empty Water From Basin When Done)
  2. Pick Up After Yourself–Bottles and Cans In Here
  3. Get Your Drinks and Snacks Here
  4. Do Not Touch
  5. Please Put All Wet Towels On Line To Dry
  6. Return Tools To This Area When Done
  7. Chairs Go Here When Not In Use
  8. First Aid Kit
  9. Please Ask Chief Cook And Bottle Washer If (S)He Needs Help
  10. Never Leave The Site Without Telling Someone

–The ideas are endless, and they work.

The Final Solution.

Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and speak to someone. Most of the time it’s not a problem–family members expect communication lines to be open–but when it’s a friend you’ve invited along it can be tricky. Decide if you will just pick up after them and then never invite them again, or if there is a tactful (very, very tactful) way of speaking to them about the mess they are leaving everywhere. Sometimes you can use humor to diffuse the situation. You need to ask yourself, though, if it’s worth losing a friendship over.  If you don’t do it exactly right, that pal you like enough to invite may never spend time with you again. Sometimes, as mentioned before, you may just decide to pick up after them. Put the onus on yourself if they mention something. “Yes, I’m very picky. I love a tidy camp site.” A worthwhile pal will try to stay tidier; maybe not perfect, but better.

Keeping your camp site clean and organized makes it easier to pack up when you go home, and when you leave a site as clean or cleaner than when you came, you’re doing everyone a favor. (More signage.)

 

 

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